Fletcher Farm School

Fletcher Farm School for the Arts and Crafts is the oldest residential Art and Craft School in Vermont. Our students and instructors come from all over the United States to participate in an artistic community that offers an explosion of talent, creativity, learning, and sharing. Stay in our rustic accommodations, with three meals a day or choose from many of the local bed and breakfasts. Our classes include a range of the old (Bobbin Lace) to the new (Macro Photography with your iphone or ipad). From Fine Arts to Woodworking, we offer a diversity of classes.

History of the School

The Fletcher Farm School for the Arts and Crafts is owned and operated by the Society of Vermont Artists and Craftsmen, Inc., founded in 1947. The mission of the Society is “to provide an immersion into the world of arts and crafts while educating all ages in traditional methods as well as in new approaches to creative art forms, in a unique and historic Vermont setting."

In 1948 the Trustees of the Fletcher Farm Foundation invited the Society to open a Craft school. That summer Fletcher Farm School opened its doors to 33 students taking five courses. Its purpose is to provide instruction in Arts and Crafts under the expert guidance of talented professionals, and provide Vermont Craftsmen a place to sell their crafts, which includes two Arts and Crafts Festivals in the summer and a Gift Shop on campus, where they can sell their art. The School now offers over 200 classes year round, in addition to the Young Artist Program which combines the freshness and creativity of youth with the wisdom and talent of the seasoned artist.

History of the Campus

Jesse Fletcher, a Revolutionary War soldier, came to this area because of the wonderful spring of water found here. The” ell” of the 18th century Farmhouse was built by Jesse and is believed to be the oldest frame house in the area. The property grew over the years as did his family (11 children). After many generations the property was purchased by Governor Allen Fletcher. He left the property to his widow Mary and his daughters Mary and Fanny, who resolved to perpetuate the memories of the family farm by having it used as a non-profit educational center.